Eliminating Emotional Barriers

Have you ever had one of THOSE days?

One that turned into a week or more of procrastination that ended up hurting your GPA?

So…….what’s the problem?

Emotions can have a powerful effect on you.

Unchecked anxiety and stress can wreak havoc on self regulated learning. They can destroy self efficacy and create barriers to motivation that can have disastrous effects on academic performance.

Before we explore more about emotions, please fill out this short survey.

What role do emotions play in my self efficacy and motivation?

Emotions play important roles in preparing necessary behavioral responses, refining decision making, enhancing memory for important events, and facilitating interpersonal interactions. But emotions can be damaging as well as helpful. They are destructive when they occur at the wrong time, or at the wrong intensity level. (Gross and Thompson, 2006).

What does that mean for me?

Within the context of self regulated learning, emotions can affect self efficacy and motivation both positively and negatively. Unchecked anxiety and stress can wreak havoc on self regulated learning. They can destroy self efficacy and create barriers to motivation that can have disastrous effects on academic performance. We need to work to regulate our emotions.

What can I do?

There are things that you can do……

What is ONE key message for me to walk away with?

The most effective method to help regulate your emotions is to LAUGH! Laughter can help put things in perspective. Look at the bigger picture “don’t sweat the small stuff…..and its all small stuff.”

References

Dweck, C.S. (2000). Self Theories: Their Role in personality, motivation and development. Lillington, NC: Taylor and Francis.

Dwyer, A.L., & Cummings, A.L. (2001). Stress, self-efficacy, social support, and coping strategies in university students. Canadian Journal of Counseling,3 5(3), 208-220

Elliot, E.S. and Dweck, C.S (1988). Goals: An approach to motivation and achievement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54, 5-12.

Garcia, T. & Pintrich, P.R. (1994). Regulating motivation and cognition in the classroom: the role of self-  schemas and self-regulatory strategies. In D.H. Schunk and B.J. Zimmerman (Eds.), Self-    Regulation on Learning and Performance: Issues and Applications (pp.132-157), NJ, Hillsdale, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Gross, J.J., & John, O.P. (2003). Individual differences in two emotion regulation processes: Implications for affect, relationships, and well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 348-362.

Gross, J.J., & Thompson, R.A. (2007) Emotion regulation: Conceptual foundations. In J.J. Gross (Ed.), Handbook of emotion regulation. New York: Guilford Press.

Mayer, J. D., & Stevens, A. (1994). An emerging understanding of the reflective (meta-) experience of   mood. Journal of Research in Personality, 28, 351-373.

Rijavec, M., & Brdar, I. (1997). Coping with school failure: Development of the School Failure Coping Scale. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 12(1), 37-49.

Rijavec M., & Brdar I. (2002). Coping With School Failure And Self-Regulated Learning. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 17(2), 177-194.

Weiner, B. (1986). An attributional theory of emotion and motivation, New York: Springer-Verlag.

Wolters, C. (1998). Self regulated learning and college Students’ regulation of motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 90(2), 224-235.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: